Publications

Publications

  • Graduate student Jordan Snyder and Sea Grant Assistant Director for Research Damian Brady and their colleagues have a new paper in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science about their NOAA Sea Grant-funded research on developing tools for siting aquaculture operations. Here's the abstract of the article: "Remote sensing data is useful for selection of aquaculture sites because it can provide water-quality products mapped over large regions at low cost to users. However, the spatial resolution of most ocean color satellites is too coarse to provide usable data within many estuaries. The Landsat 8 satellite, launched February 11, 2013, has both the spatial resolution and the necessary signal to noise ratio to provide temperature, as well as ocean color derived products along complex coastlines.

  • Between the head of tide above Bangor to where it widens into the bay at Searsport, the Penobscot River shifts from a flowing freshwater waterway banked by cedar and pine to a brackish, wave-lapped marsh with a rocky shoreline. In this estuary, salt concentrations fluctuate as the winds and tides push sea water and sediments back and forth. 

  • from UMaine News 

    Access to Maine’s beaches and coastal areas can sometimes be a challenge. According to the latest analysis of property ownership data by the Maine Coastal Program, the public owns just 12 percent of Maine’s 5,400-mile shoreline. Public rights to the rest of the coast vary considerably, from submerged areas below low tide through the intertidal zone to upland areas. Unlike most other states, Maine and Massachusetts extend most private property rights to the low-tide mark.

  • Understanding coastal property law can be daunting for land owners, beach visitors, and municipal officials. Public Shoreline Access in Maine: A Citizen’s Guide to Ocean and Coastal Law describes Maine law and prominent court cases related to public use and access to the coast, from the seventeenth-century Colonial Ordinance that reserved the public’s right to “fishing, fowling and navigation” in the intertidal zone to the recent decision by the Maine Supreme Judicial Court regarding public use of a private road to access Cedar Beach in Harpswell.

  • It's elver season in Maine. Funnel-shaped fyke nets have appeared in coastal rivers and streams; we've seen them in the Medomak, the Union, and Northeast Creek.

    Learn more about eels in The Secret Life of Eels (pdf), published in the March-April issue of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine (online). Featuring photographs by Heather Perry Photography, the article describes the natural history of the American eel, current UMaine research on eels, and a brief summary of the eel fishery in Maine.

  • We are excited to announce the release of what we hope will be the first in a series of animated videos about climate change in the Gulf of Maine, informed by our work on the Maine's Climate Future project. Produced in partnership with Maine-based O'Chang Studios, "The Lobster Pot Heats Up" illustrates how climate change affects lobster and the lobster industry. 

  • Maine’s Climate Future 2015 builds on the Maine’s Climate Future 2009 report (below); it is not intended as a comprehensive revision of all aspects of the original report. This update focuses on highlights of our understanding in 2015 of past, present, and future trends in key indicators of a changing climate specific to Maine, and recent examples of how Maine people are experiencing these changes. Produced in partnership with the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine.