Fisheries Heritage

Harvester perspectives on alewives, blueback herring, and American eels in Downeast Maine

Fishermen and women, by virtue of spending much of their time on the water with hooks, lines, traps, and nets, have intimate knowledge of coastal, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. They know, in detail, the local distribution, abundance, and behavior of the species they harvest, knowledge gained from years of first-hand observations and experimentation with different fishing techniques.

Newfoundland: Lessons for Maine

The Role of Tourism in Fisheries Crises: The Case of Newfoundland and Applications to Maine

Tourism is increasingly touted as a development opportunity for coastal and rural areas affected by natural resource decline. As commercial fisheries face depletion the world over, people look to tourism to help coastal communities recover from economic crisis, but little work has been done to explore if the investment in tourism can ever replace the full human ecological value of the fishery, including its impacts on a region’s culture, economy, and environment.

Watershed Kiosks

In 2006, staff at the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Maine Field Office initiated a partnership with Maine Sea Grant to produce content for two informational kiosks planned for the lower Penobscot River region. The Penobscot River watershed is currently the subject of an unprecedented restoration plan that will restore access to over 1,000 miles of rearing and spawning habitat for Atlantic salmon, alewives, sturgeon, and other species of sea-run fish.

The Kennebec Celebration

Formerly known as the Spring Running, the KENNEBEC CELEBRATION is heading into its seventh year as an annual festival geared towards “Celebrating the Spring Running and Life In, On and Along the Kennebec River.”  The event is free, family-friendly and typically takes place on the second Saturday in June on the grounds of Old Fort Western and the East Side Boat Launch in downtown Augusta.

 

Downeast Fisheries Trail

The Downeast Fisheries Trail has a new website!  Check it out for description of of the 45 sites on the Trail, events, activities, fantastic historical images, and much more.   Downeast Fisheries Trail also has a Facebook page.

What is the Downeast Fisheries Trail?
The Downeast Fisheries Trail is an educational trail that showcases active and historic fisheries heritage sites, such as fish hatcheries, aquaculture facilities, fishing harbors, clam flats, processing plants and other related public places in an effort to educate residents and visitors about the importance of the region’s maritime heritage and the role of marine resources to the area’s economy. The Trail builds on these local resources to strengthen community life and the experience of visitors.