Sustainable Seafood

Sustainable Seafood

Emerging Species for Seaweed Aquaculture

Emerging Species

The University of Maine’s Center for Cooperative Research is home to the sea vegetable aquaculture nursery where new native species are being developed for aquaculture. Dulse (Palmaria palmata), laver (Porphyra umbilicalis), horsetail kelp (Laminaria digitata), gracilaria (Gracilaria tikvahiae), and skinny kelp (Saccharina latissima forma angustissima) are all in various stages of development. 

Seaweed Aquaculture Industry Overview

Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) was the first commercial kelp crop to be cultivated in Maine in 2010, with other native species under development since then.

References & Resources

Cited Sources

Carignan, S. 2014. New Maine festival to celebrate benefits of seaweed. Bangor Daily News, Maine. Aug. 27, 2014.

Chopin, T., AH Buschmann, C Halling, M Troell, N Kautsky, A Neori, GP Kraemer, JA Zertuche-Gonzales, C Yarish, and C Neefus. 2001. Integrating seaweeds into marine aquaculture systems: a key toward sustainability. Journal of Phycology 37:975-986.

Crawford, 1991. The Macroalgae Industry in Maine. Maine/New Hampshire Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program, University of Maine. 29pp.

Financing and Crop Insurance Programs

Monday, April 25th, 2016
5:30 p.m. at UMaine's Hutchinson Center in Belfast

An introduction to programs from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and Maine Farm Service Agency that may be of interest to shellfish growers. 

Seaweed Production on Mussel Farms in Maine

A Pilot Project to Stimulate Seaweed Production on Mussel Farms in Maine

Seaweed is a $6 billion-dollar industry worldwide. Different types of seaweed (also called sea vegetables or marine macroalgae) are harvested for a variety of uses including fertilizer, food ingredients, and nutritional supplements.

Maine’s established seaweed companies are industry leaders, and more people are looking to grow seaweed as a business or for supplemental income.