Rachel Lasley-Rasher's blog

Scallop survey in a tube: Skylar Bayer is developing a molecular technique to detect scallop spawning events in the field

NOTE: This blog was written by Skylar Bayer, a graduate student at the University of Maine, working on a Sea Grant-funded project with Dr. Rick Wahle of University of Maine, and Dr. Pete Countway of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

Using remotely operated vehicles to characterize habitat at a large scale

 Our Director for Research, Dr. Damian Brady published a paper along with Dr. Robert Steneck and former graduate student, Jennifer McHenry (lead author) titled, Abiotic proxies for predictive mapping of near-shore benthic assemblages: Implications for marine spatial planning. In this paper researchers identified important habitat variables and spatial gradients that correlate with abundance, diversity, and commercial value of species assemblages in the Gulf of Maine using a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV).

Spying on salmon: Graduate student uses surveillance cameras to observe ecological interactions in a changing climate

NOTE: This blog was written by Nicole Ramberg-Pihl, a graduate student at the University of Maine, working on a S

Recent publication on larval lobster in a changing Gulf of Maine

Effects of temperature and ocean acidification on larval lobster development – UMaine graduate student, Jesica Waller, along with Dr. Rick Wahle and colleagues published a paper on the joint effects of ocean acidification and rising temperature on larval lobster development. Their results suggest that elevated temperatures associated with projected end-century warming trends cause larvae to develop faster but also induce physiological stress, leading to increased mortality rates.

A student “from away”: A native Kansan’s perspective on field research and becoming a Mainer

NOTE: This blog was written by Jacque Miller, a graduate student at the University of Maine, working on a Sea Grant-funded project with Dr. Alice Kelley

Kelps in Hot Water: How are seaweeds responding to a rapidly warming Gulf of Maine?

NOTE: This blog was written by Thew Suskiewicz, a graduate student at Université Laval in Quebec working on a Sea Grant funded project with Dr. Robert Steneck 

New publication by Maine Sea Grant researcher, Dr. Yong Chen

A new publication by Dr. Yong Chen and colleagues, "An evaluation of underlying mechanisms for 'fishing down marine food webs'" takes a closer look at a metric, mean trophic level, commonly used to evaluate fishery sustainability. This paper adds to a long list of publications by Dr. Chen addressing the emergent patterns and underlying processes involved in the management of marine resources. Check out Dr.

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