Our Sacred Seasons

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Thu, 08/22/2013 - 14:35

The Salarius blog has been running for nearly three years. In that time, I’ve covered the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico; the Boston Seafood Show; restaurants and festivals that serve Maine seafood; Sea Grant-funded research on seafood; lobster, oysters, shrimp, scallops, alewives, smelt, sardines, crab, eel, salmon, and sea vegetables; and the ever-elusive notion of “sustainable seafood.”

The Seaweed Scene 2013

The Seaweed Scene is a meeting to network with colleagues, catch up on the latest in research and development, and to help plan the future for seaweed science, management and industry. 

The Seaweed Scene 2013 was held on August 29th from 9am to 4pm at the University of Maine's Hutchinson Center, in Belfast, Maine.  The day included presentations from science and industry experts, plenty of time for networking, and facilitated discussion to cover the important topics for the future of aquaculture and harvest of marine macroalgae.   

Using Temperature Data from the Maine Shellfish Monitoring Program to Help in Siting Shellfish Aquaculture Farms

Developed by Maine Sea Grant and Maine Department of Marine Resources


WHAT temperature data are available from the Maine Dept. of Marine Resources?
The Maine Dept. of Marine Resources records shoreline temperatures along the entire coastline, through its water quality sampling program and the volunteer phytoplankton monitoring program. These data are available upon request. This page is designed to help current and prospective aquaculturists access this data, for consideration in siting their farms.

Top Ten Reasons Why Seafood Fraud Hurts Us All

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Wed, 03/06/2013 - 17:17

10. We can't trust our food. An estimated 10% of seafood is not the species it is sold or marketed as, and certain species are more likely to be false than others.

9. People are paying for more than they get - maybe 40% of the time.

8. Faking it is easy. Most of the seafood most of us buy and eat is in skinless, boneless, sometimes coated or breaded or otherwise concealed pieces, rather than whole. Processed fish is harder to evaluate "organoleptically."