Sea Smoke

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Tue, 01/06/2015 - 09:42

If the air is still and cold enough, great wisps of sea smoke hover and drift above the water surface. That “smoke” actually is water vapor that forms when really cold air moves over relatively warmer water and the thin boundary layer of warm air just above the surface. When the evaporating water rises, the cold air can only hold so much moisture, forcing the liquid to condense into fog. Clouds rise like smoke from the sea’s surface, dispersing and reforming, turning bays and coves into ephemeral cauldrons of submarine fire.

Seaweed Scene 2014

The "Seaweed Scene 2014" was held on the beautiful oceanfront campus of the Southern Maine Community College in South Portland, ME, on August 30th. The morning meeting reviewed the latest from the new seaweed farmers and researchers in Maine and Long Island Sound.

Squid Fingers

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Fri, 08/15/2014 - 14:06

While out on the Damariscotta River this morning in search of wild oysters at low tide (more on that story later), we came across this giant, gelatinous mass on the shore of Goose Ledge. None of us, not even the one who is on the water every day, had ever seen anything like it. The fingery protrusions were all connected, the whole mass jiggled when prodded. Was it alive? Did it sting? 

On Jellyfish

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Fri, 07/18/2014 - 09:35

News media and Sea Grant’s coastal correspondents (a.k.a. the Marine Extension Team) have been reporting jellyfish sightings along the coast, from Casco Bay to Penobscot Bay to Frenchman Bay.

I saw them, too—a parade of moon jellies moving up the Damariscotta River.
The tide was going out and the jellies were coming in, one after another pulsating toward head of tide.

Summer's Here

Submitted by Esperanza Stancioff on Thu, 06/19/2014 - 11:58

I found this little guy (right: American Toad Anaxyrus americanus) on a hike in Camden Hills last summer. It was a thrilling experience and a rare occurrence for me. I remembered my mom telling me as a child that I would get warts from handling them—which is not the case. The American toad does produce a toxin in glands behind its eyes that can be harmful to our pets and us; yet for the toad, the toxin provides protection.

National Working Waterfront Network Receive Grant to Support Cultural Heritage of Working Waterfront Communities

Submitted by Natalie Springuel on Tue, 04/01/2014 - 16:10

National Working Waterfront Network steering Committee members Kenneth Walker, Stephanie Otts, Natalie Springuel, and Kristen Grant have received a $9,000 grant from the NOAA Preserve America Initiative. The project, which is intended to build on the Outreach and Education Committee's case study work, will capture both oral histories on working waterfront issues and community efforts to preserve working waterfronts. The grant funds were awarded to NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.