On Jellyfish

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Fri, 07/18/2014 - 09:35

News media and Sea Grant’s coastal correspondents (a.k.a. the Marine Extension Team) have been reporting jellyfish sightings along the coast, from Casco Bay to Penobscot Bay to Frenchman Bay.

I saw them, too—a parade of moon jellies moving up the Damariscotta River.
The tide was going out and the jellies were coming in, one after another pulsating toward head of tide.

Summer's Here

Submitted by Esperanza Stancioff on Thu, 06/19/2014 - 11:58

I found this little guy (right: American Toad Anaxyrus americanus) on a hike in Camden Hills last summer. It was a thrilling experience and a rare occurrence for me. I remembered my mom telling me as a child that I would get warts from handling them—which is not the case. The American toad does produce a toxin in glands behind its eyes that can be harmful to our pets and us; yet for the toad, the toxin provides protection.

National Working Waterfront Network Receive Grant to Support Cultural Heritage of Working Waterfront Communities

Submitted by Natalie Springuel on Tue, 04/01/2014 - 16:10

National Working Waterfront Network steering Committee members Kenneth Walker, Stephanie Otts, Natalie Springuel, and Kristen Grant have received a $9,000 grant from the NOAA Preserve America Initiative. The project, which is intended to build on the Outreach and Education Committee's case study work, will capture both oral histories on working waterfront issues and community efforts to preserve working waterfronts. The grant funds were awarded to NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.

The Miracle of Teamwork

Submitted by Kristen Grant on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 11:59

Maine Sea Grant partners with the Workforce Housing Coalition of the Greater Seacoast to host design workshops or “charrettes” that help coastal communities envision how to provide homes for people who work in town – people who earn an average income, like entry level teachers, fire fighters, police, as well as hospital and retail workers. These are people who are often priced out of homes in coastal communities due to the high real estate costs there.

The Future of the Salarius Blog

Submitted by Natalie Springuel on Mon, 02/24/2014 - 15:00

Salarius means "of salt" in Latin. Because salt once constituted a form of currency, Salarius also refers to salt money, an allowance, pay. The ocean pays back, sustains us; it provides food, oxygen, and a livelihood for the people of Maine pas, present, and (hopefully) future. For the authors of this blog, Salarius encompasses all things related to the ocean, the Maine Coast, and the people who live, work, and play here.