Marine science - and economic impact - for Maine people.

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Tue, 05/23/2017 - 21:20

Maine Sea Grant has been providing marine science research, education, and outreach for 35 years. Sometimes our work yields positive economic benefits. In just the last four years, Maine Sea Grant activities generated an estimated $22 million in economic impacts, created or sustained 300+ businesses and 130 jobs, and provided 200 communities with technical assistance on challenging issues including working waterfront preservation, coastal infrastructure, and fishing industry diversification.
 

Read more about our impacts in this one-page fact sheet.

The Beaches Conference: Join the Conversation

Submitted by Kristen Grant on Mon, 07/03/2017 - 11:12
In 2017, the organizers, speakers, and participants are more committed than ever to this pattern of mutual respect as this year the reach of the conference continues to expand. For the first time the conference is no longer The Maine Beaches Conference because we jumped the Piscataqua River to officially include Seacoast New Hampshire. A leap of this sort naturally calls for a name adjustment, so for 2017 the event has been deemed The Beaches Conference, Our Maine and New Hampshire Beaches and Coast. With this expansion came the added benefit of enthusiastic partners from NH to join the steering committee, as well as a huge bump-up in the number of presenters from NH.

Elemental Intersections

Submitted by Catherine Schmitt on Mon, 07/03/2017 - 10:43

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Please join us July 7 for the first in a series of public conversations that bring together ceramic art masters, scientists, and Maine people working in natural resource fields to examine intersections between art and contemporary environmental issues.

Coastal Conversations | Sea Kayak Safety in Cold Water

Submitted by Natalie Springuel on Tue, 05/09/2017 - 10:53
The weather is getting warmer and people in Maine are anxious to get their kayaks and other boats in the water, but boating safety advocates remind us that ocean temperatures take a lot longer to warm than the air. This is Natalie Springuel, from the University of Maine Sea Grant, host of Coastal Conversations. On our next program, we’ll explore concerns related to cold water boating and how to prepare for safe and enjoyable adventures on the ocean and lakes of Maine.

Coastal Conversations Radio Program: Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET)

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During this week’s Coastal Conversations we’ll be hearing about a comprehensive research project being led by the University of Maine call the Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network or SEANET.  This 5-year, National Science Foundation-funded, grant is made possible through the ESPCoR program which is hosted at the University of Maine